Premiere: Youth Model, “Open Season EP”

Premiere: Youth Model – Open Season EP

 

First and foremost, Charleston, SC based Youth Model is not ashamed of their pop inclinations. Their newest EP, Open Season is their honest take on the lighter side of alt rock without departing too far from pop sentiment. The six songs run the sonic spectrum with riffing on title track “Open Season,” quirky opener on “Versions”, and weighty meaning on “Tried this Time” and “Heaven.” As I’ve heard Randy say multiple times, “We aren’t trying to reinvent the wheel here,” it’s true they aren’t exploring unknown territory but they have pulled influence from a gambit of alternative pop creators. Continue reading

Album Review: Stolen Jars, “Kept”

Stolen Jars Kept
(Self – August 28, 2015)
(Indie Pop, Math)
Review by Kalyn Oyer

 

Stolen Jars coalesces a complex accumulation of sounds, step-by-step, driven by stacked layers of some of the best repetitive guitar riffs I’ve heard. These rhythmic stratums serve as the core of Stolen Jars’ sound, allowing the exaggerated ability to inhale and exhale with the emotional ebbs and flows of each track. The sound can both explode and retract by cutting in and out of looped tracks. A carefully constructed repetition is the elemental lyrical and sonic glue, while the duo of Cody Fitzgerald and Molly Grund on vocals blends into a soothing tension. Angelic harmonies float across angsty boundaries and sink into an ultimate, relieved bliss. Continue reading

Album Review: Mauno, “Rough Master”

Mauno Rough Master
(Self – August 19, 2015)
(Indie Rock, Experimental, Folk)
Review by Rob Leonard

 

Mauno is a masculine name of Finnish origin meaning ‘great’. Whether or not this is the intention behind Halifax’s Mauno or not, the label rings true. Fronted by Nick Everett, a busy musician with previous folk leanings in the realm of Andrew Bird, Mauno pushes forward with interestingly arranged, guitar driven indie rock – somewhat of an endangered species until Real Estate’s Days, released in 2011.  The beauty of Rough Master is in it’s no thrills, no antics approach. Continue reading